Funeral Homes and Body Donation

By: Schilling Funeral Home & Cremation
Monday, September 16, 2019

Most people assume that their only two options for their bodies post-death are cremation and funeral homes in Dixon, IL. However, there is a third option that can not only save money, but can also help you do your part to help others long after you’re gone.  

Body donation is an important part of modern medicine. Whether the body is used for research, transplants, or even both, it is going towards saving lives. Giving all or part of your body to help save others is noble and always appreciated. According to the National Funeral Directors Association (NFDA), a full organ donor will either save or better the lives of 6 to 8 people, while a full tissue donor can better the lives of 50 or more people.  

Most people don’t know much about body donation even though it’s so important. Or, all that most people think they know about body donation is based on myth. The following are 4 body donation myths and their truths to set the record straight.  

  1. I Won’t Be Able to Be Cremated Or Buried After The Donation – Most people fear that their bodies will be disposed of in any way the organization feels after the donation is complete. This is not true. The majority of bodies donated are cremated after any procedures are completed. In fact, some medical facilities that get a lot of body donations often have a memorial service at the end of their training in recognition and respect for their donors. In many cases, the cremated remains can also be returned to the family for burial.  
  2. Body Donation Costs More – There is absolutely not cost to the donor or donor family involved in body donation. In fact, the organization that receives the body pays all related donation costs. For example, if it’s a transplant, the receiving patient’s insurance usually covers the cost. Or, if the body is being donated to a medical training facility, the facility furnishes all necessary costs.  
  3. Donors Don’t Get Saved – A common way of thinking is that doctors and nurses don’t work as hard to save donors, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. When you’re in a hospital or doctor’s office, the medical professionals are only focused on helping you, not some amorphous donor. Organ and tissue donation is only considered when there is no other option to save or revive the potential donor in question.  
  4. I'm Sick So I Can’t Donate – Don’t assume that a body won’t qualify as a donor because of disease or other sickness. Some diseases only affect one part of the body, making the rest totally viable. For example, someone that died of heart disease may still be able to donate his or her eyes. Let the professionals decide if your body is a prospect for donation.  

Body donation might not be for everyone, but it can be a great choice for those interested in helping others after they’re gone. Do you want to learn more about body donation, or about your other options for Dixon, IL funeral homes? Schilling Funeral Home & Cremation is here to help. Contact us by visiting 702 1st Ave Sterling, IL 61081, or calling (815) 626-1131.  

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