Cremation Service Ovens

By: Schilling Funeral Home & Cremation
Monday, March 9, 2020

Many bereaved have questions about the cremation services in Rock Falls, IL which is understandable as its not common knowledge how it works and its done. One of the most common areas that people have questions about is the mechanics of cremation, specifically how the cremation oven works.  

 

Most cremation ovens are made out of fire-resistant bricks and special masonry. The fire-resistant bricks line the interior of the chamber on the ceiling and walls. Specially made masonry materials cover the bottom of the chamber as that is the area that is exposed to the highest temperatures. Cremation oven walls are usually about 6 inches think to keep the extreme heat contained. They can have manually or mechanically operated doors depending on the model and design.  

 

The cremation chamber, sometimes called an oven or a retort, operates between 1,400- and 1,800-degrees Fahrenheit. This high heat is necessary to break down the body into small fragments of bone and ash and is generally produced by propane or natural gas. 

 

Organic body materials like skin, tissue, organs and muscle are oxidized and then vaporized during the cremation process, as the human body is mostly made of water, bone and carbon. These vapors are filtered and released through the oven’s exhaust system. All that remains after a cremation is bone fragments and non-organic materials like artificial bones or joints, implants, or dental work. All jewelry and removable medical devices are taken off the body before the cremation. The bone fragments are separated from non-organic materials and then left to cool. After cooling, they are processed and broken down into what we call ashes, with a texture like coarse sand. These ashes are placed in sealed bag and returned to the bereaved so they can inurn, bury, scatter or spread them as they so choose.  

 

All bodies are placed in a cremation container before the cremation takes places and for the duration of the process. This is to stay in compliance with health and safety codes and to maintain the dignity of the deceased before, during and after the cremation.  

 

There are certain container specifications that also must be met for health and safety laws, but the remainder of the container details can be chose by the bereaved. Many choose standard corrugated boxes, and others choose wooden containers or caskets. No matter what kind of container is chosen, its purpose is to hold the body before the cremation and break down entirely during the cremation, so no residue is left.  

 

If you have more questions about the cremation process or would like to learn more about your options for Rock Falls, IL cremation services, Schilling Funeral Home & Cremation is here to help. We offer a wide range of services from 702 1st Ave Sterling, IL 61081, and have years of industry experience that we are ready and willing to put at your disposal. Please feel free to stop by and visit us or give us a call at (815) 626-1131 for more information on what we can do for you.  

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